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The Processional Colonnade of Amenhotep the Third
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About The Processional Colonnade of Amenhotep the Third
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The colonnade, which now forms the entrance to the temple of Amenhotep the Third, was added to the north of the temple. It consists of seven pairs of open-papyrus columns, each about 16 meters or 52 feet high.

The colonnade was left undecorated after the death of Amenhotep the Third. His successor, Amenhotep the Fourth, or Akhenaten, should have decorated it for his father, but Akhenaten moved his residence to Akhetaten, also called Tell el-Amarna.

The walls were not decorated until the time of Tutankhamun and Horemheb. On the walls are scenes of the Opet feast, the annual ceremony of the journey of the barks, or small ships, that carry the statues of the deities Amun-Re, Mut, and Khonsu from Karnak to the Luxor Temple. The walls were later reused by Seti the First, Merenptah, and Seti the Second.

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