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Culture: Greco-Roman Culture: Greco-Roman

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Title Type
Acroterium Base with a Lion Head
Acroterium Base with a Lion Head

A small Acroterium base ends with an open-mouthed lion head. The lion has hollow eyes and a long mane. It is possible that this acroterium was the base of a statue. The "acroterium" means a small base for a statue or other ornament.

Accessory

Alexander Severus
Alexander Severus

The throne of the Roman Empire was assigned to Alexander (A.D. 222–235) after the name Severus was added to his own name. Alexander was a fourteen-year-old boy with no knowledge of affairs of state or ability to fulfill his responsibilities. He was, thus, controlled by powerful men in the palace.

Emperor

Alexander the Great
Alexander the Great

Alexander the Third, or "Alexander the Great," was the son of Philip the Second of Macedon by his wife Olympias. One of the most important things that Alexander did was to establish Alexandria, which was built by his chief architect, Dinocrates.

King

Alexander the Great in Egypt
Alexander the Great in Egypt

In the autumn of 332 BC., Alexander the Great conquered Egypt, an event that marked the beginning of the Greek period in Egyptian history. The time he spent in Egypt was just six months. However, his brief stay was full of reforms and events that put Egypt within the orbit of Greek civilisation in the Mediterranean.

Article

Alexandria
Alexandria

Alexandria was founded in 331 BC by Alexander the Great. The planning of the city was entrusted to the Greek architect Dinocrates. The city of Alexandria is famous for its ancient library; the Museion, or museum; the Serapeum, or temple; Pompey's Pillar and the catacombs.

Archaeological Site

Almond-Shaped Lamp
Almond-Shaped Lamp

This almond-shaped lamp has an opening for oil in the center that is surrounded by circular ridges.

Lamp

Amphora from Rhodes
Amphora from Rhodes

An amphora from Rhodes, it was found in the sea at Abu Qir near Alexandria. It is unusual in having a cylindrical neck and a pear-shaped body.

Amphora

Amphora with Long Neck
Amphora with Long Neck

This elongated vessel has a long neck and a conical body with a pointed base. The mouth is narrow, and the amphora is provided with two handles. Amphoras were made to contain liquids such as wine.

Amphora

Amphora with a Wide Mouth
Amphora with a Wide Mouth

A locally produced amphora with a wide mouth, the neck has long vertical incisions that continue all along the neck and down to the body of the amphora. It has two round handles. There is a hole underneath each handle.

Amphora

Ancient Egyptian and Greek Law and Women
Ancient Egyptian and Greek Law and Women

Greek and Egyptian legislation was different in regard to the social status and independence enjoyed by women.

Article

Anthropoid Coffin with Hieroglyphics
Anthropoid Coffin with Hieroglyphics

This coffin of a woman from the Ptolemaic period still contains her mummy. She is shown on the lid wearing the long tripartite wig. The coffin is decorated on the sides with two long serpents.

Coffin / Sarcophagus of Humans

Aphrodite
Aphrodite

Aphrodite is the Greek goddess of love and beauty. The Romans called her Venus. She had a belt combining elegance and beauty.

Goddess

Apis
Apis

Apis was the sacred bull of Memphis. He was called the son of Ptah. When Apis died, his mother became the goddess Isis.

God

Apollo
Apollo

Apollo is the son of Zeus and Leto. In poetry Apollo was pictured as the handsome god. He is the musician who entertains the gods with his golden lyre.

God

Arsinoe the Second
Arsinoe the Second

Arsinoe the Second, daughter of Ptolemy the First and Berenice the First, was born in 316 B.C. and died in 270 B.C. Arsinoe was married three times, the last time to her brother Ptolemy the Second, known as Philadelphus.

Queen

Asclepius
Asclepius

Asclepius was the god of healing in the Greco-Roman period. The snake, which represented the transition from death to life, played an important role in his cult.

God

Aswan
Aswan

Aswan is the southernmost town in Egypt. Its name was derived from the Ancient Egyptian word Swn, which means "market", "to trade" or "trading."

Archaeological Site

Basalt Royal Head
Basalt Royal Head

A large royal head made of basalt. It wears a headdress that has embossed vertical lines. On the forehead there is the uraeus (royal cobra).

Head

Berenice the First
Berenice the First

Berenice the First was the daughter of Lagos; he was also the father of Ptolemy the First and Antigun. She was born in 340 B.C. and died between 281 and 271 B.C. Berenice was originally a Macedonian lady who came to Egypt with Eurydice's entourage. She married Ptolemy the First in 316 B.C.

Queen

Berenice the Second
Berenice the Second

Berenice the Second was the cousin and wife of Ptolemy the Third. She was left to rule Egypt until her husband returned from war. Later, her elder son poisoned her when she tried to put her younger son on the throne.

Queen

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