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Style: Old Kingdom Style: Old Kingdom

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Title Type
Alabaster Headrest
Alabaster Headrest

The ancient Egyptians slept on beds covered with mattresses and provided with headrests. It is believed that the headrest allowed air to circulate round the neck of the sleeper, or kept his hairstyle in shape. In this headrest, the base, the shaft and the neck support are carved from the same block.

Headrest

Amulet in the Form of a Cow
Amulet in the Form of a Cow

The gold cow might have been used as an amulet or a piece of inlay. Attached to its neck is a sistrum, which is a musical rattle and symbol of the goddess Hathor. In Ancient Egypt, the cow is Hathor's sacred animal.

Amulet

Base of a Statue of Djoser
Base of a Statue of Djoser

This limestone pedestal is from a statue of Djoser stepping upon the nine bows, representing the enemies of Egypt. The name of the vizier Imhotep is also inscribed on the pedestal.

Base

Bed of Queen Hetepheres
Bed of Queen Hetepheres

This marvelous bed, which belonged to Queen Hetepheres, rests on four gilded wooden supports in the form of lion's legs. Her son, King Khufu, transferred her funerary bed from Dahshur to Giza to provide more security.

Bed

Block Bearing the Name of King Sahure
Block Bearing the Name of King Sahure

This small hieroglyphic inscription gives only two names for King Sahure. The first one is the Horus name, while the second is the royal cartouche.

Relief

Burial Chamber of Deshri
Burial Chamber of Deshri

The walls of this burial chamber are decorated with scenes showing different offerings. Through magic, these offerings would be transformed into real offerings for the deceased in the netherworld.

Burial Chamber

Bust of King Neferefre
Bust of King Neferefre

The bust portrays King Neferefre. His eyes and eyebrows are depicted with cosmetic lines in a remarkable way. He is shown wearing the traditional Nemes headdress, the upper part of which is not striped as usual.

Statue

Chair of Queen Hetepheres
Chair of Queen Hetepheres

The wooden chair is composed of a seat, backrest, and simple wooden frame covered with gold leaf. The chair is decorated with an elegant floral design and has lions' paws for legs.

Chair

Colossal Head of King Userkaf
Colossal Head of King Userkaf

The features are so elegant that this head was first believed to be of the goddess Neith. However, the fine mustache proved that it was Userkaf's portrait.

Head

Column of King Niuserre
Column of King Niuserre

This six-sided column has a capital in the form of a closed papyrus. The names and titles of King Niuserre are engraved on its body.

Column / Pillar

Corbel with Northern Foes
Corbel with Northern Foes

During the New Kingdom, these architectural elements were used for decoration in secular or religious buildings such as royal palaces where they adorned the bottoms of the windows. This piece consists of two heads representing foreign enemies from the north, depicted with their characteristic pointed beards.

Architectural Unit

Cosmetic Items of Queen Hetepheres
Cosmetic Items of Queen Hetepheres

Queen Hetepheres possessed wonderful golden vessels and cosmetic articles, most probably used for shaving and applying cosmetic unguents.

Artifact

Cylindrical Vessel of King Djoser
Cylindrical Vessel of King Djoser

This vessel is one of thousands discovered under the pyramid of Djoser at Saqqara. They were used to keep different kinds of food and drinks for the King to consume it in the netherworld.

Receptacle / Vessel

Double Statue of Nimaatsed
Double Statue of Nimaatsed

These nearly identical statues share one base but differ slightly in height. Nimaatsed wears a short kilt and a short wig. His eyelids, eyebrows, and fine mustache are painted in black.

Statue

Double Statue of a Man and Wife
Double Statue of a Man and Wife

This double statue probably depicts Meres-ankh and his wife, as it was found in his mastaba (tomb) at Giza. The man wears a curled wig, and has a fine mustache. He is wearing a short kilt with an overlap and a wide collar of polychrome faience. The lady's arm is round the shoulder of her husband.

Statue

Double Statue of a Man and his Wife
Double Statue of a Man and his Wife

The husband and wife are shown standing; both of them are wearing wigs that reach their shoulders. The woman's wig is detailed and composed of multiple plaits. The man wears a moustache; such moustaches were mostly depicted on the statuary of the Old Kingdom. Seated or standing statues of this type show the charming, close relationship between a husband and his wife.

Statue

False Door of Ika
False Door of Ika

The upper panel of this false door depicts the owner and his wife sitting at an offering table. They are accompanied by their children in images depicted on the doorjambs.

False Door

False Door of Ishti
False Door of Ishti

The false door of Ishti has scenes showing him sitting on a block chair at an offering table heaped with rows of loaves of bread. A false door allows the soul and guardian spirit of the dead to receive offerings and hear prayers.

False Door

False Door of Nikaure
False Door of Nikaure

This false door portrays Nikaure and his wife, Ihat. A false door allows the deceased to receive offerings and hear the prayers of the living. Nikaure and Ihat sit at an offering table and members of their family carry offerings for them.

False Door

False Door of Pepi-Seneb
False Door of Pepi-Seneb

In the door's window, Pepi-Seneb sits at an offering table. On the lintel, the horizontal stone above the door, the Hetep-di-nisw formula of the offerings is written to allow the dead to receive eternal offerings.

False Door

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