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Style: New Kingdom/18th.dyn. Style: New Kingdom/18th.dyn.
Title Type
Deir El-Medina
Deir El-Medina

The name Deir el-Medina means the Monastery of the Town. Deir el-Medina is the village of the workmen and their families who built and decorated the tombs and temples at Thebes.

Archaeological Site

Deir el-Bahari
Deir el-Bahari

The site of Deir el-Bahari lies on the west bank of Thebes. The site, which was related to the goddess Hathor, was chosen by King Montuhotep the Second and Queen Hatshepsut to erect their temples.

Temple

Dra'Abul-Naga
Dra'Abul-Naga

Dra'Abul-Naga is situated between El-Tarif and Deir El-Bahari on the west side of Thebes. It was the necropolis of the Theban rulers of the Seventeenth Dynasty and their families.

Archaeological Site

Hathor Chapel in Queen Hatshepsut's Temple
Hathor Chapel in Queen Hatshepsut's Temple

The Hathor chapel is an elegant part of the funerary temple of Queen Hatshepsut; it is located on the southern side of the second terrace of the temple and has a separate entrance.

Temple

Karnak Temple
Karnak Temple

The site of the Karnak Temples is an open natural museum of Ancient Egyptian history. It contains a mixture of the different architectural styles built by the kings who ruled the country from the Twelfth Dynasty until the Greco-Roman times.

Temple

Luxor Temple
Luxor Temple

The Luxor Temple, called "Ipet resyt", was dedicated to the Theban Triad of Amun-Re, his wife Mut, and his son Khonsu.

Temple

Medinet Habu
Medinet Habu

The temple of Medinet Habu is one of the most impressive structures west of Thebes. It was built for Ramesses the Third as a mortuary temple. The work was done under the direction of the treasurer, Amun Amonmose.

Temple

Scenes of the Opet Feast
Scenes of the Opet Feast

The relief on both long walls of the colonnade of Amenhotep the Third at the Luxor Temple shows the Opet feast, which celebrates the journey of the small ships that carry the statues of the Theban Triad from the Temple at Karnak to the Luxor Temple and back again.

Temple

Tell El-Amarna
Tell El-Amarna

Tell El-Amarna was the new capital founded by King Akhenaten. It lies 45 kilometers or 28 miles to the south of Beni-Hassan. Remains of the old capital still exist.

Archaeological Site

The Bark Sanctuary of Amenhotep the Third and Chapel of Alexander the Great
The Bark Sanctuary of Amenhotep the Third and Chapel of Alexander the Great

Inside the sanctuary of Amenhotep the Third, the sacred bark of Amun-Re was kept after it had been brought from Karnak. During the time of Alexander the Great, the present chapel was built and decorated with depictions of Alexander worshiping various Egyptian deities.

Temple

The Dream Stela of Tuthmosis the Fourth
The Dream Stela of Tuthmosis the Fourth

Tuthmosis the Fourth of the Eighteenth Dynasty ordered a granite stela, now known as the "Dream Stela," to be erected between the paws of the Sphinx.

Archaeological Site

The Forecourt of Amenhotep the Third
The Forecourt of Amenhotep the Third

The huge forecourt of Amenhotep the Third at Luxor Temple contains 64 columns arranged in double rows on three sides. It was the main gathering place for the common people.

Temple

The Hypostyle Hall of Amenhotep the Third
The Hypostyle Hall of Amenhotep the Third

The hall of Amenhotep the Third is a hypostyle hall, in which the roof rests on rows of columns. It contains 32 clustered papyrus columns arranged in fours and the walls are decorated with scenes of the king making offerings to Amun-Re.

Temple

The Luxor Temple Hidden Statues
The Luxor Temple Hidden Statues

Excavations on the southwestern side of the forecourt of Amenhotep the Third at Luxor Temple uncovered a hidden storage room that contained 26 well-preserved statues of kings, queens, and deities.

Temple

The Offering Table Room of Amenhotep the Third
The Offering Table Room of Amenhotep the Third

Offerings and sacrifices were placed in the offering table room of Amenhotep the Third when the bark, or small ship, of Amun-Re was stored in its sanctuary at the Luxor Temple.

Temple

The Processional Colonnade of Amenhotep the Third
The Processional Colonnade of Amenhotep the Third

The colonnade, which now forms the entrance to the temple of Amenhotep the Third, consists of seven pairs of columns. The colonnade was left undecorated after the death of Amenhotep the Third until the time of Tutankhamun and Horemheb.

Temple

The Vestibule at Luxor Temple
The Vestibule at Luxor Temple

The vestibule, a passage between the outer door and the interior rooms, at the Luxor Temple might have been used initially as the hall of the "Royal Appearances" during the time of Amenhotep the Third. The hall was later turned into a Roman temple, then a camp for the soldiers of Emperor Diocletian, and finally a Coptic Church.

Temple

Valley of the Kings
Valley of the Kings

The Valley of the Kings took its name from the furnished rock-cut tombs for the kings of the Eighteenth, Nineteenth, and Twentieth Dynasties. At least 26 of the 32 rulers of these dynasties were buried in the Valley of the Kings. It lies about six kilometers or four miles from the western bank of the Nile at Thebes.

Necropolis

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