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Scenes of the Opet Feast

Temple

The relief on both long walls of the colonnade of Amenhotep the Third at the Luxor Temple shows the Opet feast, which celebrates the journey of the small ships that carry the statues of the Theban Triad from the Temple at Karnak to the Luxor Temple and back again.

The Avenue of Sphinxes at Luxor Temple

Temple

The Avenue of Sphinxes at the Luxor Temple was a double line of human-headed sphinxes. On feast days, priests paraded along this avenue, carrying the wooden barks, or small ships, that held shrines containing the statues of the deities Amun-Re, Mut, and Khonsu.

The Bark Sanctuary of Amenhotep the Third and Chapel of Alexander the Great

Temple

Inside the sanctuary of Amenhotep the Third, the sacred bark of Amun-Re was kept after it had been brought from Karnak. During the time of Alexander the Great, the present chapel was built and decorated with depictions of Alexander worshiping various Egyptian deities.

The East Tower of the Pylon

Temple

The East Tower of the Pylon shows scenes of the battlefield where King Ramesses the Second is riding in his war chariot.

The Facade of the Pylon at Luxor Temple

Temple

The pylon, or temple gateway, at Luxor Temple was built during the reign of King Ramesses the Second. It is decorated with panoramic scenes and texts of the famous Battle of Kadesh.

The Forecourt of Amenhotep the Third

Temple

The huge forecourt of Amenhotep the Third at Luxor Temple contains 64 columns arranged in double rows on three sides. It was the main gathering place for the common people.

The Great Court of Ramesses the Second

Temple

Scenes in relief on the walls of the Great Court of Ramesses the Second portray the festivals celebrated by the royal family and officials. The court is surrounded by a double row of columns and the southern end has huge standing statues of Ramesses the Second.

The Hypostyle Hall of Amenhotep the Third

Temple

The hall of Amenhotep the Third is a hypostyle hall, in which the roof rests on rows of columns. It contains 32 clustered papyrus columns arranged in fours and the walls are decorated with scenes of the king making offerings to Amun-Re.

The Luxor Temple Hidden Statues

Temple

Excavations on the southwestern side of the forecourt of Amenhotep the Third at Luxor Temple uncovered a hidden storage room that contained 26 well-preserved statues of kings, queens, and deities.

The Northeastern Portion of the Court

Temple

The northeastern portion of the Great Court of Ramesses the Second contains the mosque of the Muslim saint Sidi Abul Haggag. It has a view of the back of the east tower of the pylon, or temple gateway, which is inscribed with two important scenes.

The Northwestern Part of the Court

Temple

The northwestern part of the Great Court of Ramesses the Second contains the triple shrine that housed the wooden bark, or small ship, that held the statues of the three deities Amun-Re, Mut, and Khonsu.

The Obelisk in Front of Luxor Temple

Temple

The obelisk, a four-sided pillar that tapers into a pyramid, is dedicated by Ramesses the Second to the temple and the deity Amun-Re on the occasion of the king's jubilee.

The Offering Table Room of Amenhotep the Third

Temple

Offerings and sacrifices were placed in the offering table room of Amenhotep the Third when the bark, or small ship, of Amun-Re was stored in its sanctuary at the Luxor Temple.

The Processional Colonnade of Amenhotep the Third

Temple

The colonnade, which now forms the entrance to the temple of Amenhotep the Third, consists of seven pairs of columns. The colonnade was left undecorated after the death of Amenhotep the Third until the time of Tutankhamun and Horemheb.

The Southwestern Wall of the Court

Temple

The southwestern wall of the Great Court of Ramesses the Second shows the pylon, or temple gateway, being approached by princes and high officials bringing ornamented bulls for sacrifice. From the horns of the bulls emerge the king's enemies, identified by their ethnic features.

The Vestibule at Luxor Temple

Temple

The vestibule, a passage between the outer door and the interior rooms, at the Luxor Temple might have been used initially as the hall of the "Royal Appearances" during the time of Amenhotep the Third. The hall was later turned into a Roman temple, then a camp for the soldiers of Emperor Diocletian, and finally a Coptic Church.

The West Tower of the Pylon

Temple

The scenes on the West Tower of the Pylon show King Ramesses the Second attending a war council and the daily activities inside the camp.

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